Artwork, testing and new character animation

Since our trailer video was released, we’ve done a -huge- amount of work updating the textures, scene dressing and improving materials throughout the different areas of the game. We have also done a completely new pass on the texture maps for the main character, Sam, bringing his quality up dramatically. We’ve created hundreds of “smalls” models to help fill out the environments and give them a more realistic and lived-in feel. Alongside this we’ve done new passes on a lot of the larger prop pieces, bringing up the quality across the board, concentrating on trying to stabilise our overall texture density across the game. This has helped making the props fit together in the scenes, without noticing a difference in quality between props due to texture size/detail and the technical ability of the different modellers we’ve had working on the project so far. In game prop paintings Another addition to the game are our oil painting props that include over forty unique, contemporary and classically-themed paintings created by Jackie Pearce (yep, we are related :D). Visit Jackie’s page on the prestigious Saatchi Online gallery, where you can see some of her amazing work. An example, in game, can be seen above. Testing We are currently testing the puzzles and general interaction-based flow of Thanatophobia, and the bug list has dwindled. I’ve actually now managed to play the game from beginning to end (minus a small number of features we are waiting for implementation), and even knowing exactly what to do, the solutions to all of the puzzles, not reading any of the clues/notes and with no enemies, it takes...

Alleyway scene modelling

One of the most exciting parts of creating Thanatophobia for me was when the alleyway scene went into a proper iteration of modelling. The procedural buildings seen in our original screen shots were simply just pre-alpha place holders and were then generated with more features and randomised weathering for more variation up close. Other additions to the alleyway map included a more advanced sky material with blended clouds, real-time randomised lightning and a dynamic, sphere mask moon (massive thanks to Julio Juarez for the fantastic dynamic sky information and tuts, more of which can be found, along with some of his incredible work on Mass Effect 3, on his website). I worked hard on the scene think it’s starting to look quite good for a DX9 rendered scene. The first copy of my show reel above, is mostly taken from Thanatophobia. Here you can see some info on materials and methods I used, and it is a good way to sneak-peek some of Thanatophobia to you!...